Secondary

In CAIS’ secondary school, we continue to walk the pathway to success together. Every student’s journey is individual, and our teachers and advisers help students to discover and develop their God-given gifts and abilities.

Secondary students diversify their school life in the many new learning experiences available. For example, they may become involved in community service through the Social Justice Club, or in sharing the Gospel through Glow In the Dark.  From organized clubs and groups like the Strategy Games Club, to informal social connections formed with chess games, table tennis, and foosball in the atriums, students are immersed in the many spheres of secondary life.

In high school, students are challenged to reflect critically and think creatively. They are challenged to consider why they believe what they believe and consider how these beliefs should affect our actions in society. Students learn to engage the digital age effectively, not merely as consumers, but as creators.  The curriculum challenges the students in well-rounded academics, but our teachers challenge the students with even larger questions of what they have been created to do, and how their learning can help them realize their purposes.


Secondary

In CAIS’ secondary school, we continue to walk the pathway to success together. Every student’s journey is individual, and our teachers and advisers help students to discover and develop their God-given gifts and abilities.

Secondary students diversify their school life in the many new learning experiences available. For example, they may become involved in community service through the Social Justice Club, or in sharing the Gospel through Glow In the Dark.  From organized clubs and groups like the Strategy Games Club, to informal social connections formed with chess games, table tennis, and foosball in the atriums, students are immersed in the many spheres of secondary life.

In high school, students are challenged to reflect critically and think creatively. They are challenged to consider why they believe what they believe and consider how these beliefs should affect our actions in society. Students learn to engage the digital age effectively, not merely as consumers, but as creators.  The curriculum challenges the students in well-rounded academics, but our teachers challenge the students with even larger questions of what they have been created to do, and how their learning can help them realize their purposes.